Is A Ductless System Really Better Than A Centralized System?

Is A Ductless System Really Better Than A Centralized System?

 

Normally, ductless air conditioners are used in single-room settings, such as a room addition or garage conversion. However, some homeowners today are considering replacing their entire centralized heating and cooling systems with an entirely ductless system. This approach isn’t as common as most. However, due to energy efficiency here lately, a ductless mini split seems to be becoming more popular.

The Benefits of an Entirely Ductless System

There are two main reasons why homeowners today are deciding to replace their centralized heating and cooling systems with ductless systems: environmental concerns and energy costs. As the threat of climate change grows, many homeowners are looking for ways to lower their carbon footprint. Cost efficient homeowners are also looking to find ways to lower their monthly energy bills. Who can blame them? Replacing a centralized heating and cooling system with a ductless alternative can accomplish both goals!

Consider the following realities:

  • By some estimates, about 25 percent of the energy generated in a centralized heating and cooling system gets lost to the ductwork — a non-issue with ductless systems.
  • The inner workings of a ductless system are inherently conducive to energy savings. In a centralized heating and cooling system, the compressor turns on and off in response to changes in the system’s needs, but with a ductless system, the compressor only speeds up or slows down, which is less energy-intensive.

Homeowners may also opt to make the switch from to a fully ductless system if there are varying climate control needs in different parts of the home. For instance, in a home where several renters each have a room but share a central living area, a ductless system can enable each tenant to choose the temperature of their own room. For quiet homes whose kids have left for college and who rarely spend time in rooms other than the kitchen, living room, and master bedroom, it simply just does not make sense to use a centralized heating system that unnecessarily keeps empty rooms warm in the winter and cool in the summer.

The Upfront Costs of Ductless Systems

The primary deterrent for homeowners who are considering replacing a centralized system with a ductless system is the upfront cost. Depending on the cooling capacity, cooling efficiency, and brand, a ductless air conditioner can range in cost from around $1000 to around $3,300. The energy savings may make up for the upfront costs in the long-run, but you have to recognize that adopting an entirely ductless heating and cooling system for your home is going to be a significant initial investment.

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